Sports Business

W. P. Carey researchers say the Phoenix area benefits greatly — both economically and otherwise — from its portfolio of major sporting events. Not all cities can say the same.

In the Super Bowl advertising arms race, companies spend millions on mere seconds. Is it worth it? Nancy Stephens, associate professor of marketing, says no. Companies that spend huge sums hoping to hold the attention of the large Super Bowl audience compete with the party atmosphere around the big screen TV. But Ray Artigue, executive director of the W. P. Carey MBA Sports Business Program and former senior vice president of marketing for the NBA's Phoenix Suns, says the gamble can be worth it, depending on the product or service being promoted and the size of its market.

The sports industry operates by its own set of rules when it comes to achieving and measuring success. In Part Two of our discussion, Knowledge@W. P. Carey looks at the economic impact teams have on local economies. Ray Artigue, executive director of the W. P. Carey MBA Sports Business Program and former senior vice president of marketing for the NBA's Phoenix Suns, discusses publicly-funded stadiums and other aspects of the sports business. Joining him is Robert Stearns, professor of practice in the W. P. Carey School's finance department and chairman and chief executive officer of Quepasa Corporation.

Professional sports are a multimillion dollar industry — an industry that is increasingly playing by rules that don't apply to other businesses. Ray Artigue, executive director of the W. P. Carey MBA Sports Business Program and former senior vice president of marketing for the NBA's Phoenix Suns, discusses the curious business of sports with Knowledge@W. P. Carey. Joining the conversation is Robert Stearns, professor of practice in the finance department at the W. P. Carey School of Business and chairman and chief executive officer of Quepasa Corporation.

The passion of fans for their teams is the stuff of family lore and Hollywood scripts, and it's that emotional charge that makes the business of sports distinct. What other business can claim that its customers are in love with its product? But television revenues, high ticket prices and a myriad of entertainment choices are changing the economics of the industry. Is the romance cooling for fans, and if so, what does it mean for sports? Experts from the W. P. Carey School of Business faculty weigh in.