Researchers at ASU link air pollution to Alzheimer's disease

Is it a good day to play outside? If the local air pollution is high, it may be best to remain indoors unless you wear a smog mask. While that may sound dramatic, economics professors Assistant Professor of Economics Kelly Bishop, Associate Professor of Economics Nicolai Kuminoff, and health care economist and the Earl G. and Gladys C. Davis Distinguished Research Professor in Business Jonathan Ketcham found that prolonged exposure to dirty air can lead to Alzheimer's disease, among the many other issues linked to breathing pollutants in the atmosphere. What's another alternative? Vote for policymakers that support the Environmental Protection Agency's mission, "to protect human health and the environment based on the best available scientific information."

In this article Sept. 14, 2018, in the Arizona Republic :

It's really the fine-particulate matter, the air-pollution particulates smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter that we see causing increases in dementia. Across the United States, exactly what's in that PM2.5 differs.

Nicolai Kuminoff, associate professor of economics

One of the implications for policymakers today is that we find the benefits for reducing pollution exist, even below the current EPA threshold. Lowering them further would have additional benefits in terms of reducing dementia in the U.S.

Jonathan Ketcham, who is a health care economist and the Earl G. and Gladys C. Davis Distinguished Research Professor in Business