Research

A look at how political identity influences purchase preferences

New research found that conservatives are more likely to think that uglier produce might taste better or that appliances that are less technologically advanced may last longer.

The XX factor of innovation: Women managers

Corporations have long sought the elusive X factor: that one variable capable of ensuring a competitive advantage. Is it innovation? Flexibility? A dynamic leader? Research shows that firms might just benefit from the XX factor — the two X chromosomes representing female cells.

Can technology predict whether a company should take on debt or not?

New research that uses machine-learning algorithms — like the ones that block email spam and detect credit card fraud — answers whether a company should issue stock or bonds to finance their future operations.

Sustainable labeling — and information — stimulate a higher willingness to pay among coffee drinkers

Are consumers willing to pay more for sustainably grown coffee? And if so, why? New research found that people's motivations for being willing to pay more were mixed, but buying a sustainable product because it makes them feel good about themselves was the surprise front-runner.

Fake thumbs can silence real voices in an online commentary

Are online discussions affected by bot-assisted, computer-based propaganda operations? Sang-Pil Han, associate professor of information systems, studied this question as it relates to something vital to democracy: people's willingness to speak their minds.

What a foreign accent says about a CEO to investors

CEOs with foreign accents get more respect from investors. That's the finding of research by Leonardo Barcellos, an assistant professor of accounting.

Affordable health insurance still a barrier to preserving US farm businesses

An ASU agribusiness professor and fellow researchers wanted to see if the amount of farm families' off-farm work changed with the Affordable Care Act of 2009, which offers subsidies to make health insurance premiums more affordable for workers who don't have employer-sponsored insurance.

What motivates financial journalists

Only 29% of adults in the United States say they trust the news most of the time, and studies suggest many have begun avoiding news media altogether out of skepticism about whether what they’re seeing is true. For financial journalists, however, a new study from ASU could change this.

What drives consumers to purchase healthy foods?

Assistant Professor Lauren Chenarides at the Morrison School of Agribusiness, along with other agricultural economists, examined the stumbling blocks people with low incomes face when shopping for nutritious food.

Category-spanning: Are you confusing customers or winning new ones?

How would you react if your favorite brand of golf clubs started selling tennis racquets? Or if your favorite beer started manufacturing juice? Would you rush to purchase, or would you view these newcomer products with suspicion?